First of Spring

The weather is becoming more predictable.  Not predictable enough to order our generators (which have to be craned through the roof of the boat) or complete the mast wiring.  However, we were able to make progress on painting, porthole welding, and repairing scuppers.

Paint

We are using Amerlock 400/2 as a primer and PSX 700 as the top coat.  Both are industrial paints from PPG.  It has taken several applications to get accustomed to the paint, and now it's working very well.  The Amerlock is watertight with three applications by roller.  It cures above 30 degrees, is rain safe in 6 hours (with northern California winds), and hard as steel in 24 hours. The paint takes on a high sheen that is good as a final coat on most work surfaces. 

The PSX 700 also cures above 30 degrees, but is ready to recoat in 4 hours. The coating is high gloss, and can be patched without leaving a trace (critical since we cannot get the entire boat prepped at one time with our limited crew).  PSX 700 can be recoated without sanding which is a major advantage, and the coverage is excellent. It takes about 6 gallons to coat one side of the boat with Amerlock, and a little more than 2 gallons to cover the same area with PSX 700.  

The prep has been minimal.  We have numerous rust spots about the size of a quarter, and about a dozen rust problems where two plates meet. Paint used by the previous owner simply washed off, and below this coat of cheap paint was the last coat applied by the Coast Guard.  It is tough. No need to scrap or chip this base.  

 

 Fir as she sat when we found her in the winter of 2016.

Fir as she sat when we found her in the winter of 2016.

 A few months later in the Spring of 2017. At this point we are color testing the white on the A Frame and the red and blue on the stack.

A few months later in the Spring of 2017. At this point we are color testing the white on the A Frame and the red and blue on the stack.

 Late fall 2017.  Note the tenders have been removed from the aft deck. Solar panels added. A first coat of PSX700 has been applied to the superstructure. A final coat of PSX700 red and blue has been applied to the stack.

Late fall 2017.  Note the tenders have been removed from the aft deck. Solar panels added. A first coat of PSX700 has been applied to the superstructure. A final coat of PSX700 red and blue has been applied to the stack.

 Early spring 2018.  Amerlock primer is applied to the freeboard. Note that the "phone booth" above the wheelhouse has been removed.

Early spring 2018.  Amerlock primer is applied to the freeboard. Note that the "phone booth" above the wheelhouse has been removed.

 Two coats of Amerlock primer later, we applied the blue PSX700 below the bumper.

Two coats of Amerlock primer later, we applied the blue PSX700 below the bumper.

 The first coats of PSC700 white, red, and blue are applied to the forward freeboard. Amerlock black applied to the anchor and anchor box.

The first coats of PSC700 white, red, and blue are applied to the forward freeboard. Amerlock black applied to the anchor and anchor box.

Portholes

For whatever reason, the starboard side of the boat took the brunt of the weather over the last couple of years.  This trip, Joe completed welding the last of the portholes. We painted the hull under the portholes with Amerlock to create a barrier. And, when Joe re-installed the portholes, he coated the internal lip with PPG chalk.  

During the porthole restoration process, we cut 43 brass slotted screws. They have to be custom made at a cost of $13 each -- ouch.    

Water Tanks

We took another pass at the aft water tanks.  The water tanks are tough  because they dry slowly due to poor air circulation.  We pressure washed the tank on the last trip. Then we spot blasted in the beginning of this trip.  Once dry, Amerlock 400/2 was applied to bare metal spots.  Amerlock is rated for underwater service but the coating has to be thick. We coated the bare spots with black Amerlock.  We will come back with a more general coating in white. 

Wardroom

The old wardroom ceiling had been covered with a variety of paints. This was not a big deal because the last restoration included the installation of a drop ceiling. We want to go back to the original tin ceiling.  Between rain storms, we used a cheap needle gun from Harbor Freight to remove the old paint. 

 

Melton McGuire

The Lighthouse Project LLC