January 28 - February 2, 2018

Some trips are better than others. The last trip was much longer.  We put in a lot of hours, but there was little noticeable progress. This time, in only a few days, we were able to resolve a number of nagging issues.

Pulling Wires

Our most significant accomplishment is getting wires pulled from the Wheelhouse to the junction box at the base of the kingpin.  Previously, the wire bundle ran up the A-frame, through the boom control room, then again up the A-frame to the crow's nest. The old run of wires was chaotic and impractical unable to support new equipment.  Plans to remove the boom control room would require that we rerun the wires.  In order to accomplish this we needed create a new wiring harness for the A-Frame, 

 Preparing the wire bundle for the A-Frame

Preparing the wire bundle for the A-Frame

The new system is based around a 1.5 inch conduit.   We will channel wires from the crawl space below port side of the Wheelhouse.  The bundle will be directed out the side of the Wheelhouse, up the A-Frame support, and to a junction cabinet on the intermediate crow's nest.

We ran a rope through the conduit to determine the length of the run.  We then laid the wires across the deck and cut them to length.  The new wires include:

  1. LMR400 coax cable for Class A AIS transceiver (primary system)
  2. Type 53 tinned coax cable for AIS receiver (backup system)
  3. Tinned Ethernet cable for broadband radar
  4. Tinned Ethernet cable for X-band radar
  5. Tinned Ethernet cable for satellite weather system
  6. NMEA2000 mini network cable for the weather station and GPS
  7. 10 Gauge pair for the 24 volt anchor light
  8. 10 Gauge pair for the 24 volt masthead light
  9. 12 Gauge pair for the 24 volt aircraft lights
  10. 10 Gauge pair for the broadband radar
  11. 10 Gauge pair for the X-band radar
  12. 10 Gauge pair as a spare

In total the run was just short of 100 feet.  With three men and a lot of KY the new bundle was pulled through the conduit. 

 New junction box mounted to the A-Frame.  Wires run from the Wheelhouse crawlspace to this box. Device wires then run from the box to the top of the mast.

New junction box mounted to the A-Frame.  Wires run from the Wheelhouse crawlspace to this box. Device wires then run from the box to the top of the mast.

Electrical

The electrical reconfiguration of Fir is vital to her functioning and certainly one of the most important decisions to be made.  We don't want to rewire the entire boat, however time and technology have made it necessary for major changes to the existing system. While permanent solutions are researched numerous temporary endeavors have been put in place.  On any given day the deck will have a minimum of two portable gasoline generators, and a nest of extension cords traveling in all directions.  

Through trial and error clairity is gained.  We started building boxes to set the stage for a new system.  First priority is to move essential controls to the Wheelhouse starting from the power supplies.  We mounted the 110 volt AC box in the Wheelhouse, powered up the 12 volt DC and 24 volt DC power supplies, and built the DC boxes.  This gave us the capability to power all of our new equipment and switches.   

 " Blue Water Console "  port side of the Wheelhouse. The three boxes (from left to right) are the 110 volt AC, 24 volt DC, and 12 volt DC supplies for the new Wheelhouse equipment. January 2018

"Blue Water Console"  port side of the Wheelhouse. The three boxes (from left to right) are the 110 volt AC, 24 volt DC, and 12 volt DC supplies for the new Wheelhouse equipment. January 2018

Structure

We were able to get a first primer coat on the starboard side of the hull.  With temperatures in Stockton finally above 60 degrees, the fog burned off by late morning, and we had a window to apply paint. First we sprayed the surface with muriatic acid to burn off organic materials and surface rust.  After a few hours of letting the acid sit we washed down the hull removing the acid with a lower pressure nozzle. We followed with an application of strong detergent and a final pressure wash using the turbo nozzle.  

 The first coat of primer is applied to the hull above the splash zone.

The first coat of primer is applied to the hull above the splash zone.

Cleaned and ready to prime we began with small paint brushes to cover and/or fill all the imperfections and angles on the hull. The Fir has her share of welds and angles where water will sit, therefore we want an especially thick coating in these areas. Once the spot work was complete we rolled the hull using a 3/4" nap roller. One side was covered with two gallons, however It will take 20 gallons to achieve the impenetrable density we're looking for. 

 The first coat of primer applied to the hull

The first coat of primer applied to the hull

Tender

A break in the weather has finally allowed us to paint the bottom of the tube for the Willard tender.  For several months the tube has been kept on the buoy deck consuming nearly all available working space.  Getting the tube back on the tender will create necessary work room essential to our progress.

 The Willard tender on the Buoy Deck on January 2018

The Willard tender on the Buoy Deck on January 2018

 Finally getting the tube mounted to the tender.

Finally getting the tube mounted to the tender.

Old Wardroom

Joe took one day to work on the paneling in the old Wardroom.  He put up several panels of teak, and completed a new closet with aromatic cedar.   We will temporarily keep the demising wall to the bathroom open allowing us to plumb in hardware. 

 

 The Wardroom in January 2018. The wood panel in the center is the top of console for the Wheelhouse.

The Wardroom in January 2018. The wood panel in the center is the top of console for the Wheelhouse.

 A new closet off the Wardroom paneled in cedar. This aromatic wood acts as a natural repellent. 

A new closet off the Wardroom paneled in cedar. This aromatic wood acts as a natural repellent. 

Melton McGuire

The Lighthouse Project LLC